Tag Archives: policy

ANALYSIS – Clinton takes bigger role in China ties

Hillary

ANALYSIS – Clinton takes bigger role in China ties

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has hired envoys to tackle most tough foreign policy issues, but one priority she kept is China as Washington seeks Beijing’s help on challenges from North Korea to Iran.

Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner co-host two days of “strategic and economic” talks with top Chinese officials this week — meetings traditionally handled by the Treasury under the former Bush administration.

Sidelined recently by an elbow injury, Clinton also wants to reassert herself as a key player amid reports she is playing a lesser role in crafting foreign policy for President Barack Obama, her rival in last year’s Democratic presidential race.

Officials say Clinton — whose first foreign trip was to China — wants improved relations with Beijing to be a signature issue, with plans to broaden the previous focus from largely economic ties to a more “comprehensive” relationship.

“Over the past few years, the dialogue tended to shift significantly towards the economic and financial side,” said Clinton’s spokesman, P.J. Crowley.

“I think it (Clinton’s new role) reflects a return to a really broad range of issues, rather than a fairly narrow set that might have been the focus of the agenda over the past couple of years.”

The goal of the talks on Monday and Tuesday in Washington is to set a framework for the Obama administration’s agenda with the Chinese government — which is sending nearly all of its key officials for sessions.

“When you look at the U.S.-China relationship, it is kind of overweight on economics and light on security and foreign policy cooperation,” said Drew Thompson, director of China Studies at the Nixon Center.

Aside from stabilizing the shaky global economy, another focus of this week’s talks will be climate change and clean energy, an area Clinton earmarked as a diplomatic priority with Beijing and where some experts expect the most movement.


Hillary Clinton , Hillary Clinton  News, Hillary Clinton  World News, Hillary Clinton  Updates, Hillary Clinton  Latest,  Hillary Clinton  Popular, Hillary Clinton  Biodata, Hillary Clinton  Biography, Hillary Clinton  Photo, Hillary Clinton  Video, Hillary Clinton  History, Hillary Clinton  Scandal, News, World news, World updates news, World today, International news, Local news, Asia news, Asia-Pacific news, Malaysia news, Europe news, U.S news, Americas news, Africa news, Middle East news, America Latin news, Asia, Asia Pacific, Malaysia, Europe, U.S, America, Africa, Middle East, America Latin, Latest news, Popular news, Breaking news, Headline news, Headline, Gallery news, News gallery, News hour, Top stories, News channel, Channel news, News web, Web news, News space, Sports news, Science news, Technology news, Science and technology news, Politics news, Political Scandal, Economy news, Health news, Business news, NASA News, Apollo 11 News, Sports, Science, Technology, Science and technology, Politics, Economy, Health, Business, NASA, APOLL O 11, Tragedy, Terrorism, Terrorist, Bf1,

Deadly Uighur riots may force policy debate in Beijing

in.reuters.com

Deadly Uighur riots may force policy debate in Beijing

BEIJING july 10 – The script is jarringly familiar. Bodies lie on riot-scarred streets of an ethnic minority area, troops fan out, unrest rumbles on and Beijing denounces overseas enemies bent on splitting China.

Less than 18 months ago, when the violence was in Tibet, China’s response appeared knee-jerk — a harsh crackdown and tight security ever since.

But as discontent played out in energy-rich Xinjiang this week, analysts say there was almost certainly a parallel round of debate taking place within the secretive Communist Party — about where policy on ethnic minorities went wrong.

Conservatives have been in the ascendant in recent years, presiding over a tightening of controls on religion and language and pushing a harsh response to the Tibetan violence that flared ahead of the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

But two explosions of deadly rioting barely over a year apart are an embarrassing public challenge to the rule of a government that has brooked little dissent since taking power in 1949.

“Frankly, coming up to the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic, it gives China a bit of a black eye to have these on-going problems,” said Dru Gladney, president of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College in California.

The Communist Party has for decades swung between hardline policies that aim to crush dissent and weaken ethnic identity and softer approaches that attempt to make minorities feel they can have a dual identity, both Chinese and Tibetan or Uighur.

Those who favour a more conciliatory approach will now likely use the explosions of violence as evidence that Beijing cannot rule its vast hinterlands by coercion alone.

But China has poured cash into Xinjiang and Tibet along with its troops and many Han Chinese think that with development subsidies, the construction of schools and clinics and some affirmative action, the government has already done enough.

“In the past, there have been policies in favour of minorities, but many minorities have not been able to take advantage of these policies,” said Bo Zhiyue, a China politics expert at Singapore’s East Asian Institute.

“I don’t think there’s a fundamental policy problem, but it’s a fundamental governance issue,” he added, expressing a view shared by much of China’s elite.

UIGHURS UNHAPPY

Uighurs, however, say they have been left behind economically as Han Chinese dominate development opportunities, are unhappy that they cannot practise their religion as they wish and resent an inflow of migrants from the rest of China.

“One would hope this would make many Chinese policy-makers realise how deep the problems are in the region and how dissatisfied the Uighurs are,” said Gladney.

China has deflected debate about domestic policy by blaming the riots on exiled separatists, but experts say China’s growing political and economic might has in fact helped stem a tide of support for independence.

Many Uighur intellectuals are now convinced that a future as a genuinely autonomous part of China could be better than independence.

“If Beijing gave them proper autonomy, stopped Han migration, and gave the people the language and religious rights that are guaranteed anyway in the Chinese constitution, they might well find that Uighurs would quite happily remain part of China,” said Joanne Smith Finley at Britain’s Newcastle University.

But for Beijing, genuine autonomy is not really an option because of the precedent it could set for other parts of the country to break away from central control.

FOREIGN POLICY RISK

Besides stirring up questions about domestic management of minority areas, the riots have put Xinjiang on the world stage, but it is unlikely to turn into another foreign policy headache.

Until now, the oil-rich region has been less of a worry for China’s diplomats than Tibet, because the Uighurs and their plight have a low profile both in the West and Muslim nations.

“The Uighurs are far away and they’re cut off from the rest of the Muslims — for instance their sheikhs do not visit other countries, unlike Indonesian ones,” said Jihad al-Khazen, a columnist at the pan-Arab al-Hayat newspaper.

Their overseas advocates are also mostly exiled Uighurs, while the Tibetan exile community by contrast has spent years building up powerful popular support for their cause in Europe and the United States, including among celebrities.

Apparent gaffes by exiled Uighur leaders by claiming images of protests in other parts of China were actually from Xinjiang have not helped and have been gleefully seized on by the government as further evidence of their “lies”.

Chinese nationalist sentiment about the Tibetan riots last year was inflamed by the perception that foreigners were trying to meddle in the country’s affairs.

But Uighur efforts to drum up foreign support have been complicated by the fact that after the Sept. 11 attacks in the United States, China successfully campaigned to have some Uighur separatist groups added to the U.S. list of terrorist groups.

“They have been suspected or accused of harbouring terrorism since 9-11. Prior to 9-11 there was a lot of support for Uighurs in the West and in Europe, but since that time there seems to be less,” said Pomona College’s Gladney.

China’s global clout, and its general refusal to comment strongly on internal affairs of other countries, may also mute leaders of Muslim majority nations who want Chinese investment.

But though individual nations have remained largely silent, or echoed China’s position of “non-interference”, the Saudi-based Organisation of the Islamic Conference, a league of 57 Muslim nations, condemned excessive use of force against Uighur civilians and urged China to investigate.

Deadly Uighur ,Deadly Uighur News, Deadly Uighur World News, Deadly Uighur Updates, Deadly Uighur  Latest, Deadly Uighur Popular, Deadly Uighur Biodata, Deadly Uighur Biography, Deadly Uighur Photo, Deadly Uighur Video, Deadly Uighur History, Deadly Uighur   Scandal, News, World news, World updates news, World today, International news, Local news, Asia news, Asia-Pacific news, Malaysia news, Europe news, U.S news, Americas news, Africa news, Middle East news, America Latin news, Asia, Asia Pacific, Malaysia, Europe, U.S, America, Africa, Middle East, America Latin, Latest news, Popular news, Breaking news, Headline news, Headline, Gallery news, News gallery, News hour, Top stories, News channel, Channel news, News web, Web news, News space, Sports news, Science news, Technology news, Science and technology news, Politics news, Political Scandal, Economy news, Health news, Business news, NASA News, Apollo 11 News, Sports, Science, Technology, Science and technology, Politics, Economy, Health, Business, NASA, APOLLO 11, Tragedy, Terrorism, Terrorist, Bf1,


SCENARIOS – Japan PM in pinch, opposition has woes before poll

7

Japan’s Prime Minister Taro Aso speaks during a joint news conference with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at Aso’s official residence in Tokyo July 1, 2009.

SCENARIOS – Japan PM in pinch, opposition has woes before poll

TOKYO (Reuters) – Moves to ditch unpopular Prime Minister Taro Aso are likely to grow ahead of a national election after the ruling bloc lost a key local race on Sunday, but the opposition has its own headache over a funding scandal.

The latest opinion polls showed the Democrats lead Aso’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) ahead of a lower house election due by October, but the gap has shrunk after the Democratic Party’s leader admitted misreporting donations.

Below are scenarios for how developments may unfold before the election. No major economic legislation is before parliament, so the jockeying is unlikely to have an immediate impact on policy, and ultimately what matters is who forms the next government.

The Democrats have pledged to reduce bureaucrats’ grip on policy, cut waste and pay more heed to consumers and workers’ interests than to companies. But like the LDP, they are putting priority on the need to foster an economic recovery rather than the repair of Japan’s tattered public finances.

PROSPECTS OF EARLY ELECTION FADING?

Aso is thought to want to dissolve the lower house for an election on Aug. 2, Aug. 8 or Aug. 9 after returning from this week’s G8 summit in Italy, for which he departs on Monday.

Some analysts say chances of that scenario are fading after an LDP candidate lost a tight race for governor of Shizuoka, central Japan, on Sunday.

A poor performance in a July 12 Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly election — seen as a bellwether for the national poll — would logically make it even less likely.

Others, though, said the possibility that a desperate Aso would dissolve parliament’s lower house soon after the Tokyo election could not be ruled out.

PARTY DUMPS ASO

Moves to dump Aso are expected to heat up following Sunday’s local election loss and intensify further if the LDP loses its status as top party in the Tokyo assembly, with possible successors including Health Minister Yoichi Masuzoe.

But Aso is the third prime minister to take office since the LDP won big in the last general election for the lower house in 2005, so changing leaders again might well outrage voters.

Finding a successor popular enough to turn the tide for the ruling bloc could be difficult.

The LDP’s poor outlook has also prompted talk of new parties, with former internal affairs minister Kunio Hatoyama, who quit the cabinet last month, and ex-financial service minister Yoshimi Watanabe, who left the LDP in January, possible focal points.

WAITING GAME

A weakened Aso might hold on in hopes that huge government stimulus steps will bolster signs of recovery from Japan’s worst recession since World War Two, encouraging voters to stick with the ruling bloc. Possible election dates in this scenario include Aug. 30, Sept. 6 and even Oct. 18.

LDP heavyweights will likely be more inclined to wait after recent surveys showed that a scandal over improper reporting of political donations by Democratic Party leader Yukio Hatoyama is eroding the opposition party’s lead over the long-ruling party.

The Democrats have already lost one leader to a funding scandal and some analysts said further erosion of voter support might even prompt them to ditch Hatoyama for Secretary-General Katsuya Okada, a policy-maven with a “Mr. Clean” image.

But the ruling party itself is far from immune to scandals.

DEMOCRATS’ WIN STILL LIKELY

The Democratic Party still looks on track to take power in the general election, although the scandal over Hatoyama’s donations is endangering its chances of winning a majority without two small allies, one leftist and one conservative.

Even if the Democrats win a majority on their own, they are expected to form a coalition with those allies, since their cooperation is needed to control the upper house. That could make policy formation a bit bumpy.

Should the ruling bloc manage to cling to power, it looks certain to lose the two-thirds majority that allows it to override the opposition-controlled upper house.

That means policies would become even harder to implement, unless lawmakers switch sides or form a “grand coalition”.

Japan, Japan news, Japan kini, Japan world, Japan asia, Japan malaysia, Japan melayu, Japan indon, Japan indonesia, Japan kl, Japan foto, Japan picture,  Japan web, Japan days, Japan new, Japan bf1, newsbf1, news bf1,  news malaysia, news indon, news indonesia, world news, days news, magazine news, new news, asia news, star news, entertainment news, friend news, politics news