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“Crayon Shin-chan” by transmitted missing, police carried out a search

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“Crayon Shin-chan” by transmitted missing, police carried out a search

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BEIJING, September 16 electricity “Crayon Shinchan” author Usui instrument were transferred missing, his family had been to Japan Saitama prefectural police requests for searches. Police and other police officers in all counties to contact the police force will be mobilized to work together to find people Usui instrument.

According to Taiwan media reports, one on the 11th instrument Usui lost sight of, 12, his family reported to the police, pointing out that the well-known cartoonist has been disappeared.

“Crayon Shin-chan” is a Japanese comic Usui instrument a very famous person’s animation work. Protagonist Nohara Shinnosuke (small new) Although a 5-year-old child, but was referred to as “the most ‘outrageous’ Children,” a playful spirit, a number of children and adults are very fond of this work.

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China raises Xinjiang death toll to 184

in.reuters.com

China raises Xinjiang death toll to 184

URUMQI, China july 11 – China has raised the death toll from ethnic rioting in the far western region of Xinjiang to 184, and for the first time gave a breakdown by ethnicity and sex of those who died, state media reported on Saturday.

The official Xinhua news agency said that 137 of those killed were Han Chinese, who form the majority of China’s population, including 111 men and 26 women.

Forty-six were Uighurs, a Turkic people who are largely Muslim and share linguistic and cultural bonds with Central Asia. All but one were men. Uighurs make up almost half of Xinjiang’s 20 million people.

Xinhua said the other dead person from the violence that erupted last weekend was a member of the Hui Muslim ethnic group which is culturally akin to Han Chinese.

Chinese authorities had delayed releasing the ethnic breakdown of the dead, possibly out of concern it would further inflame the situation.

Beijing cannot afford to lose its grip on the vast territory that borders Russia, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, has abundant oil reserves and is China’s largest natural gas-producing region.

On July 5, demonstrations in Xinjiang’s capital Urumqi by Uighurs protesting against an attack on Uighur workers in southern China turned deadly after police moved in. Shops and vehicles were burned.

Human Rights Watch said that the government had deployed some 20,000 troops in Urumqi since the riots.

“The government has promised a thorough investigation into the violence but has so far presented a skewed and incomplete picture of the unrest,” said Sophie Richardson, Asia advocacy director at Human Rights Watch.

“This raises serious doubts about its commitment to investigating all aspects of the violence rather than presenting a pre-determined version of the events.”

CHINA CONDEMNS KADEER

Urumqi is still tense, with thousands of troops and police deployed throughout the city. A brief demonstration broke out on Friday, the main Muslim day of prayer, after some mosques were opened briefly. [ID:nPEK227814]

Xinhua did not specify if any of the dead were killed on Tuesday, when Han Chinese residents of Urumqi took to the streets in demonstrations and in at least one instance clashed with Uighurs.

Many Uighurs resent controls imposed by Beijing and the influx of Han Chinese migrants, whom they say are the main beneficiaries of China’s economic development. China has blamed the unrest on “separatists”, singling out exiled Uighur businesswoman Rebiya Kadeer, who lives in the United States. Kadeer denies any involvement.

The government has slammed Kadeer and exiled Uighurs for using pictures from other incidents of unrest in different parts of China and claiming they were taken in Xinjiang.

“The discredited Kadeer surely loves the spotlight and (the) photo-op, but she should also bear in mind that greater publicity may do her more harm than good, if she keeps telling lies,” Xinhua said in an English-language commentary on Saturday.

On Friday, foreign reporters were ordered to leave Kashgar, an oasis city in southern Xinjiang that is still majority Uighur. Earlier this year, China announced plans to raze the city’s historic centre, citing concerns about earthquake safety.

The Uighur language is related to Turkish, and some Uighurs refer to their desert homeland as “East Turkestan”.

On Friday, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan called the killings in Xinjiang a “genocide”.

In Washington, two members of the U.S. House of Representatives introduced a bipartisan resolution condemning the “violent repression” of the Uighur people by China and urging Beijing to “end its slander” of Kadeer. It is unclear how soon it will come to a vote in the House.

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Strife shows ethnic tension China hopes to ignore

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Strife shows ethnic tension China hopes to ignore

URUMQI, China (AP) — Ethnic strife in China is hardly unique to the western region of Xinjiang, where 156 were killed in recent unrest.

Communal and ethnic suspicions simmer across much of China, even though 91 percent of the population are from one group, the Han Chinese.

The situation is worst in the west, the vast borderlands where Chinese imperial dynasties spilled into traditional homelands of Buddhist Tibetans, Muslim Uighurs, nomadic Mongols and Hui, a Muslim group. But other areas are not immune: in February, hundreds of Hui and Han villagers clashed in Henan province in central China, a day’s drive from Beijing.

In the latest clash, anger at the authorities’ handling of a brawl between Uighur and Han factory workers in south China triggered a protest Sunday 1,800 miles (3,000 kilometers) away in Xinjiang, the Uighur homeland. Uighurs beat Han and torched their shops and cars. After security forces quelled the riots, vigilantes on both sides attacked people in the regional capital Urumqi.

“There is huge distrust between ethnic groups,” said Nicholas Bequelin, Asia researcher for New York-based Human Rights Watch. Incidents such as the factory clash show that “people have negative stereotypes about each other, there’s racism in a sense, and every community closes ranks against the ‘waidiren’ — the people from outside.”

Government policies don’t help. Beijing has promoted economic development in Xinjiang and Tibet, but it has also imposed Chinese language and culture and ignored minority grievances, blaming overseas exiles for inciting any unrest.

Many minority communities remain poor, which only hardens Han stereotypes that other groups are lazy and ungrateful, despite the government’s economic assistance.

Even in the absence of such policies, old tensions bubble up.

February’s melee in Henan province started when Han and Hui boys quarreled over fireworks. A 2004 traffic accident in another Henan village degenerated into an ethnic fight that left seven dead officially and, according to some foreign news reports, as many as 150.

Further east in Shandong province, police shot and killed at least five Hui in a protest march in 2000 after a Han butcher advertised sales of “Muslim pork” — outraging Muslims whose dietary laws forbid the eating of pork.

Even among the Han, old feuds between clans and villages have picked up in recent years. Police deployed in March to separate two villages on the tropical island of Hainan after a fight between residents left one dead. The cause, state media said, was an 80-year-old land dispute.

Uighurs and Tibetans complain of being discriminated against when trying to get jobs and bank loans, unlike, they say, Han migrants. In Xinjiang, the Han population has soared, from 6 percent in 1949 to 40 percent in 2000.

Policies that phase out instruction in minority languages in favor of Chinese in upper grades leaves Tibetans and Uighurs feeling further disadvantaged, both in school and later in the job market. Beijing maintains the language policy is to bring these groups into the thriving mainstream.

The government also restricts religion, appointing imams and senior clerics, limiting the numbers of monks, tearing down unregistered madrassas and prohibiting minors and university students from taking part in religious services.

The government’s “attitude is that Tibetans simply have to become Chinese and Uighurs simply have to become Chinese,” said Andrew Fischer, an expert in development policies of western China at the Institute of Social Studies at the Hague in the Netherlands.

Beijing defends its approach, pointing to the economic progress and infrastructure Chinese rule has brought minority areas.

“The mainstream position for the last 50 years is that the minorities have benefited from Chinese peaceful liberation and being brought into the motherland and there’s no problem at all,” said Fischer.

The distrust of some minorities is thinly veiled. During last year’s Beijing Olympics, police told hotels near Olympic venues not to rent rooms to Tibetans, Uighurs and Mongolians.

The Xinjiang riots have stirred anger among many Han, who have seen images of bleeding Han civilians on state-controlled media.

Many comments on online forums have called for a harsher crackdown. Some even say the rioters should all be shot — a comment echoed this week by Urumqi’s Communist Party secretary, Li Zhi, who said that rioters involved in killings and violent crimes would be executed.

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