Tag Archives: burn

China denies India envoy mistreated in Yiwu court row

india, china, yiwu, denies, denies india, envoy, india envoy, china denies, mistreated, court, envoy mistreated, mistreated yiwu, yiwu court, indian, world, asia india, story, related, story media, british, nationals, indian nationals, held, hostage, held hostage, delhi, http, accessibility, yiwu shanghai, trade, from yiwu, taken, panel, while, please, experience, over, great, years, denied, that indian, balachandran, delhi, protest, delhi protest, protest over, treatment, over treatment, treatment indian, nationals yiwu, stories india, india china, china great, game, great game, bric, india bric, between, bric between, between china, brics, china brics, golden, brics golden, golden years, ahead, years ahead, after, reportedly, medication, hostage local, local traders, allegedly, reports, media reports, report, earlier, they were, were being, treated, being treated, like, animals, tuesday, ruled, laws, ruled laws, foreign, hong, surrounded, country, attention, what, protection, affairs, officials, later, external, pair, agrawal, have, their, embassy, website, embassy website, website said,

 China has denied that an Indian diplomat was mistreated during an angry court hearing in the city of Yiwu.Delhi complained after S Balachandran was reportedly denied medication when trying to secure the release of two Indians held hostage by local traders for allegedly failing to pay debts.China said media reports were “not factually accurate”.Indian media report that the two Indians are now being moved from a hotel in Yiwu to Shanghai.The two Indians had earlier told Indian television they were being treated “like animals”.On Tuesday, India warned its businessmen they were not safe to trade in Yiwu.

‘Ruled by laws’

At a press briefing China’s foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said: “Relevant media reports that the Indian consular official from Shanghai was forbidden from eating or taking his medication while in Yiwu and was surrounded and attacked do not accord with the facts.

“China is a country ruled by laws, which pays great attention to relations with India,” he said.

However, Mr Hong gave no specific account of what China believed had happened.

He said the two Indians had been put under police protection in a hotel and that five people had been arrested for “illegal detention”.

“China hopes that India treats this matter objectively and fairly,” he said.

China’s ambassador to India, Zhang Yan, met foreign affairs officials in Delhi on Wednesday and assured them that “serious attention” was being given to the plight of the two traders.

Later India’s NDTV channel quoted External Affairs Minister SM Krishna as saying the pair were being escorted by Indian consulate officials to Shanghai.

The businessmen, Deepak Raheja and Shyamsunder Agrawal, had pleaded for help in an earlier interview with NDTV.

Mr Agrawal said: “Please save us… get together and help us. They have stripped us, thrown things at us, beaten us, tortured us. We are being treated worse than animals.”

Their hotel had reportedly been surrounded by a large crowd of locals.

The pair had been held hostage by local traders for two weeks for non-payment of dues by their company, whose owner has allegedly fled the country.

On Tuesday, an advisory on India’s Beijing embassy website said businessmen could be “mistreated” in Yiwu and had “no guarantee of legal remedies”.

The strongly worded statement on the embassy website said that “Indian businessmen are cautioned to stay away from Yiwu”.

It added: “In case of disputes arising, experience suggests that there is inadequate protection for safety of persons.”

Delhi believes Mr Balachandran was denied medicine and collapsed in the courtroom in Yiwu on 31 December.

Mr Balachandran is a diabetic. He was taken to hospital in a semi-conscious state and later transferred to Shanghai, where he has improved.

india, china, yiwu, denies, denies india, envoy, india envoy, china denies, mistreated, court, envoy mistreated, mistreated yiwu, yiwu court, indian, world, asia india, story, related, story media, british, nationals, indian nationals, held, hostage, held hostage, delhi, http, accessibility, yiwu shanghai, trade, from yiwu, taken, panel, while, please, experience, over, great, years, denied, that indian, balachandran, delhi, protest, delhi protest, protest over, treatment, over treatment, treatment indian, nationals yiwu, stories india, india china, china great, game, great game, bric, india bric, between, bric between, between china, brics, china brics, golden, brics golden, golden years, ahead, years ahead, after, reportedly, medication, hostage local, local traders, allegedly, reports, media reports, report, earlier, they were, were being, treated, being treated, like, animals, tuesday, ruled, laws, ruled laws, foreign, hong, surrounded, country, attention, what, protection, affairs, officials, later, external, pair, agrawal, have, their, embassy, website, embassy website, website said,

Doctor confirms Iran prisoner abuse death

capt.photo_1251745456087-4-0

Doctor confirms Iran prisoner abuse death

CAIRO – An Iranian medical examiner found that the son of a prominent conservative politician’s adviser died from beatings and poor prison conditions, a semiofficial news agency reported Monday, in what would be the first official confirmation of a prisoner abuse death during Iran‘s post-election turmoil.

The report could be a sign that conservatives will seek to prosecute those responsible for prisoner abuse in an attempt to defuse anger over allegations that many opposition supporters detained after the disputed presidential election were tortured.

The claims have outraged many conservatives, as well as the pro-reform opposition that believes hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad stole the June election through massive vote fraud. Conservative anger has partly been driven by the death of Mohsen Rouhalamini, the son of an adviser to defeated presidential candidate Mohsen Rezaei.

Police initially suggested that Rouhalamini’s death while in custody was caused by meningitis. But the semiofficial Mehr news agency, which has close ties to conservatives, said Monday that a state forensic doctor ruled that out in a report handed over to judicial authorities about 10 days ago.

Instead, it said Rouhalamini died of “physical stress, the effects of being held in bad conditions, multiple blows and severe injuries to the body,” according to the news agency, which cited “informed sources” without revealing their names.

The report could not be independently confirmed, but conservative critics of Ahmadinejad have used the news agency to leak information previously.

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei recently appointed the brother of Ahmadinejad’s main conservative rival to head the judiciary, a move some analysts interpreted as a way to appease conservatives upset over Khamenei’s swift support of the president in the election crisis.

The new judiciary chief, Sadeq Larijani, whose brother is parliament speaker Ali Larijani, recently appointed a three-member team to supervise an investigation into the post-election unrest, including the alleged abuse of detained protesters.

The prosecution of officials accused of torture would be an embarrassment for Ahmadinejad, who has staunchly defended the security forces sent out after the June 12 election to violently crack down on the thousands of protesters who took to the streets.

The government has confirmed that at least 30 people were killed during the unrest, but the opposition believes at least 69 died. Hundreds of protesters and opposition activists were also arrested.

Rouhalamini was detained during a July 9 protest and taken to a hospital two weeks later where he died within hours. Reformist Web sites said he had been held at Kahrizak prison, where much of the alleged prisoner abuse took place, and his jaw was broken when his father received his body.

The medical examiner’s report carried by the Mehr news agency said Rouhalamini was “in bad physical condition” prior to a scheduled move to Evin prison, which is also located in Tehran.

“After his condition was seen to worsen … and after a 70-minute delay, he was taken to a hospital, where unfortunately he died,” said the report.


Doctor, Doctor news, Doctor world news, Doctor updates, Doctor latest, Doctor popular, Doctor biodata, Doctor biography, Doctor photo, Doctor video, Doctor history, Doctor scandal, news, world news, world updates news, world today, international news, local news, asia news, asia-pacific news, malaysia news, europe news, U.S news, americas news, africa news, middle East news, america latin news, asia, asia pacific, malaysia, europe, U.S, america, africa, middle east, america latin, latest news, popular news, breaking news, headline news, headline, gallery news, news gallery, news hour, top stories, news channel, channel news, news web, web news, news space, sports news, science news, technology news, science and technology news, politics news, political scandal, economy news, health news, business news, NASA news, apollo 11 news, sports, science, technology, science and technology, politics, economy, health, business, NASA, APOLLO 11, tragedy, terrorism, terrorist, Bf1, Doctor, fires, fire, blaze, firefighters, california, burn, doctor, confirms, Iran, prisoner, abuse death, Iran prisoner

Deadly wildfire surges closer to Los Angeles

California Wildfires

Deadly wildfire surges closer to Los Angeles

[media id=77 width=500 height=400]

LOS ANGELES – A deadly wildfire destroyed more than four dozen homes as it blackened a wide swath of tinder-dry Southern California forest, forced thousands of residents to flee and burned dangerously close Monday to a vital mountaintop broadcasting complex.

Fire crews battling the blaze in the Angeles National Forest tried desperately to beat back the flames and prayed for weather conditions to ease. The fire was the largest of at least eight burning across California after days of triple-digit temperatures and low humidity.

The fire scorched 164 square miles of brush, destroyed 53 homes and threatened more than 12,000 others, but the lack of wind kept them from driving stormily into the hearts of the dense suburbs northeast of Los Angeles.

The 53 homes destroyed included some forest cabins, said U.S. Forest Service spokesman Dennis Cross. He did not have an immediate breakdown on how many of the structures were full-time residences.

Columns of smoke billowed high into the air before dispersing into a gauzy white haze that burned eyes and prompted warnings of unhealthy air throughout the Los Angeles area. Smoke could be seen billowing around the fabled Hollywood sign.

“It’s burning everywhere,” U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Dianne Cahir said. “When it gets into canyons that haven’t burned in numerous years, it takes off. If you have any insight into the good Lord upstairs, put in a request.”

The exact number of people injured or threatened by the fire was still not clear. Among those evacuated were Los Angeles Dodgers shortstop Rafael Furcal and his wife from their home in La Canada Flintridge. Furcal was given the day off for Monday’s home game against Arizona.

Over the weekend, three people who refused to evacuate were burned when they were overrun by flames, including a couple who had sought refuge in a hot tub, authorities said.

Authorities revised an earlier report that five people were trapped in a canyon near Gold Creek. They later said five men and one woman refused several orders to evacuate the remote ranch.

“When we tried to get them out, they said they’re fine, no problem, they didn’t want to leave,” said fire spokesman Larry Marinas.

Fire crews set backfires and sprayed fire retardant at Mount Wilson, home to at least 20 television transmission towers, radio and cell phone antennas, and the century-old Mount Wilson Observatory. The observatory also houses two giant telescopes and several multimillion-dollar university programs. It is both a landmark for its historic discoveries and a thriving modern center for astronomy.

If the flames hit the mountain, cell phone service and TV and radio transmissions would be disrupted, but the extent was unclear. The blaze killed two firefighters who died when their truck drove off the side of a road with flames all around them.

The victims were fire Capt. Tedmund Hall, 47, of San Bernardino County, and firefighter Specialist Arnaldo “Arnie” Quinones, 35, of Palmdale. Hall was a 26-year veteran, and Quinones had been a county firefighter for eight years.

Quinones’ wife is expecting and due to give birth to their first child in the next few weeks. Hall and his wife have two boys, ages 20 and 21, and was described as a family man who loved riding motorcycles.

They died fighting a fire that showed no signs of subsiding Monday. People who fled returned to find their homes gone.

“It’s the worst roller coaster of my life, and I hate roller coasters,” said Adi Ellad, who lost his home in Big Tujunga Canyon over the weekend. “One second I’m crying, one second I’m guilty, the next moment I’m angry, and then I just want to drink tequila and forget.”

Ellad left behind a family heirloom Persian rug and a photo album he put together after his father died. “I’m going to have to figure out a new philosophy: how to live without loving stuff,” he said.

The blaze in the Los Angeles foothills is the biggest but not most destructive of California’s wildfires. Northeast of Sacramento, a wind-driven fire destroyed 60 structures over the weekend, many of them homes in the town of Auburn.

The 275-acre blaze was 50 percent contained Monday afternoon and full containment was expected Tuesday. It wiped out an entire cul-de-sac, leaving only smoldering ruins, a handful of chimneys and burned cars.

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger toured the Auburn area, where only charred remnants of homes remained on Monday. At some houses, the only things left on the foundation are metal cabinets and washers and dryers.

“It was embers traveling in the wind, landing on the roofs, landing on attics, getting into that home and burning the home on fire,” said Daniel Berlant, spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Some mandatory evacuation orders were lifted, but most residents are still being told to stay away while crews work to restore electricity and hose down embers.

East of Los Angeles, a 1,000-acre fire threatened 2,000 homes and forced the evacuation of a scenic community of apple orchards in an oak-studded area of San Bernardino County. Brush in the area had not burned for a century, fire officials said. Flames burning like huge candles erupted between rocky slopes of the San Bernardino Mountains and the neat farmhouses below.

With highs topping 100 degrees in some areas and humidity remaining low, the National Weather Service extended a weekend warning of extreme fire conditions in the central and Southern California mountains.

Winds were light, which prevented the flames from roaring at furious speed into towns. In 2003, a wind-whipped blaze tore through neighborhoods in San Diego County, killing 15 people and destroying more than 2,400 homes. That fire burned 273,000 acres — or 427 square miles — the largest in state history.

Overall, more than 2,500 firefighters were on the line. A fleet of helicopters and air tankers dumped water and retardant over the flames during the day.

In La Crescenta, where the San Gabriel Mountains descend steeply into the bedroom suburb a dozen miles from downtown Los Angeles, 57-year-old Mary Wilson was experiencing her first wildfire after nine years of living in a canyon. Her family was evacuated twice in the past five days, she said.

“We saw the flames. My daughter got really scared,” she said. But she was philosophical: “You have to surrender to the natural forces when you choose to live up here. It’s about nature doing its thing.”

Also in La Crescenta, dispatchers overnight activated a “reverse 911” system that sent a recorded evacuation warning to people, but it turned out to be a mistake.

Whaling, the L.A. County fire captain, says the message applied to only a small number of residents closest to the fire but instead a large number got the sleep-shattering calls. He said he does not know how many people were involved in the call.

“They pushed the wrong button,” he said.

Terry Crews, an actor promoting the new movie “Gamer” on KTLA-TV, talked about being forced to flee two days ago from his home in Altadena, in the foothills above Pasadena. He saw 40-foot flames, grabbed his dog and fled.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,” he said. “I’m from Michigan. I’m used to tornadoes … but to see this thing, you feel helpless.”

“This is like ‘The Ten Commandments,'” he said, referring to the movie. “You go, ‘holy God, the end of the world.'”

An animal sanctuary called the Roar Foundation Shambala Preserve, six miles east of Acton, was in the mandatory evacuation zone, but fire officials decided removing the animals would be “a logistical nightmare,” said Chris Gallucci, vice president of operations.

“We have 64 big cats, leopards, lions, tigers, cougars. … The animals are just walking around, not being affected by this at all,” Gallucci said. “But if we panic, they panic. But we are not in panic mode yet.”

Wildfires, Wildfires news, Wildfires world news, Wildfires updates, Wildfires latest, Wildfires popular, Wildfires biodata, Wildfires biography, Wildfires photo, Wildfires video, Wildfires history, Wildfires scandal, news, world news, world updates news, world today, international news, local news, asia news, asia-pacific news, malaysia news, europe news, U.S news, americas news, africa news, middle East news, america latin news, asia, asia pacific, malaysia, europe, U.S, america, africa, middle east, america latin, latest news, popular news, breaking news, headline news, headline, gallery news, news gallery, news hour, top stories, news channel, channel news, news web, web news, news space, sports news, science news, technology news, science and technology news, politics news, political scandal, economy news, health news, business news, NASA news, apollo 11 news, sports, science, technology, science and technology, politics, economy, health, business, NASA, APOLLO 11, tragedy, terrorism, terrorist, Bf1, wildfires, fires, fire, blaze, firefighters, california, burn