Tag Archives: chaos

New Character of Tekken 6

Alisa Bosconovitch

Deep in the forests of Russia is a heavily guarded research facility-the Bosconovich Laboratory. This facility was highly valued by the Mishima Zaibatsu as a hub for the organization’s military equipment development.

The lowest level of the Bosconovich Lab houses a top-secret area in which a young girl was found sleeping in a clear capsule. Her name was Alisa Bosconovich-her surname an homage to the Lab’s founder and the facility’s mysterious effects on her development. There are no other details on her..

Marshaw Law

During The King of Iron Fist Tournament 5, Marshall Law’s illegal employment in Japan was detected, causing him to be deported resulting in his deportation back to the United States. The deadline to pay for his son’s accident was approaching, but Law had no means to deliver the cash and was completely out of ideas.

With money on his mind, Law received a timely invitation from his friend, Paul Phoenix, to team up in the next tournament. Although receiving the top prize money would be difficult to accomplish alone, the likelihood of doing so would be much higher if he was to team up with another fighter. After accepting Paul’s invitation, Law realized that three people would be even better than two, so he set his eyes on the world-famous boxer, Steve.

Lars Alexandersson

The Mishima Zaibatsu started a war against the world. The rise of the G Corporation opposition resulted in a global trail of carnage. In the fray, a large portion of the Zaibatsu’s special military unit, the Tekken Force, defected from the organization.

Lars Alexandersson led the coup d’etat and became a ranking officer in the Tekken Force at a fairly young age due, in part, to his renowned physical and mental ability. Despite this high rank, Lars often fought on the front lines, which made him quite popular among his subordinates. Only he knew the fact that he drew the Mishima bloodline through his father, Heihachi. Even Heihachi was not aware of this piece of information.

Eddy Gordor

Eddy failed to win The King of Iron Fist Tournament 5. He pleaded with Jin–who had become the new head of the Mishima Zaibatsu–to help him save his mentor. Jin agreed to help develop medical treatment for Eddy’s mentor in exchange for Eddy reporting directly to him as a part of the Tekken Force. Eddy knew nothing about the Tekken Force other than the fact that it was a private military outfit, but he agreed to join if it would save his mentor.

At once, Eddy became a member of the Tekken Force and carried out the Mishima Zaibatsu’s plans of destruction around the world. Even though he knew the consequences of his actions, Eddy was unable to leave the Tekken Force. When the Mishima Zaibatsu announced The King of Iron Fist Tournament 6, Eddy joined the tournament as a member of the Tekken Force in order to eliminate those who would threaten Jin.

Yoshimitsu

Yoshimitsu was following Bryan Fury to take revenge for his fallen comrade when he noticed a sinister aura emanating from the spirit sword. The weapon, by its nature, was in continuous pursuit of blood, driving its owner insane. Yoshimitsu had been suppressing the sword’s power by supplying it with the blood of the malicious and evil; however, it was becoming more difficult to maintain the sword’s balance.

Left unchecked, there was a chance the sword may cause chaos and destruction in its quest for a new owner. To prevent this from occurring, Yoshimitsu attained the Fumaken, a sword with the ability to contain the power of the evil sword. At the same time, he joined The King of Iron Fist Tournament 6, where evil energy collected, hoping to return the balance of the spirit sword to its more stable state.

Iceland volcano ash causes fresh air travel chaos

Aviation chiefs predicted Thursday that the drifting dust could throw travel plans into disarray for a further two days, after flights were banned over more than 10 European countries.

Thousands of passengers from Hong Kong to Dublin were stranded when aviation chiefs decided it was too risky to allow planes to fly through the cloud of ash, which is upwards of 20,000 feet (6,000 metres) above the earth’s surface.

Although not visible from the ground, volcanic ash can be highly dangerous for aircraft, clogging up the engines and reducing visibility, experts say.

Up to 5,000 flights were affected by the flight bans Thursday, said Eurocontrol, the agency that coordinates flights in Europe.

Flights from all over the world, including Tokyo, Hong Kong, Dubai, Paris and Athens, were affected by the cancellations in northern Europe.

The ash from the volcano under Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier blew southeast after Wednesday’s eruption towards Scotland and Norway, before covering England and Scandinavia, according to the London-based Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre.

The drifting cloud also closed airspace in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the north of France, parts of northern Germany and part of northern Poland.

Passengers’ travel nightmare was far from over Friday, with airspace closures still in force and the European air traffic control group Eurocontrol predicting further travel chaos.

The disruption “could last two days,” spokesman Kyla Evans told AFP from the agency’s Brussel’s headquarters.

Flights between North America and Europe also faced major disruption, with half of all services expected to be cancelled Friday, according to Eurocontrol.

Farmer tells of Iceland volcano blast There are an average of 600 flights between Europe and North America a day, it said.

Britain — which closed its airspace at 1100 GMT Thursday — said the ban would stay in force until 1800 GMT Friday for most flights in its airspace.

Belgian airspace is to remain closed Friday, authorities confirmed, while Air France said its flights in and out of Paris would not run.

In Scotland, health authorities warned people to beware of possible health problems from volcano ash falling to the ground.

Norway was the first to ground its flights on Wednesday evening, followed by Scotland overnight into Thursday and then London, before air traffic controllers announced no flights could go through British and Irish airspace.

Finland closed its northern airspace an hour later, followed by Denmark and Sweden.

Paris’s two main airports and more than a dozen others in the north of France were closed Thursday, aviation officials said.

A total of 466 flights between Spain and European destinations were cancelled Thursday because of the ash by 1530 GMT, Spain’s AENA aviation authority said.

Icelandic airports, however, reported no problems.

“The wind is blowing the ash to the east,” Hjordis Gudmundsdottir of the Icelandic Airport Authority told AFP, adding: “It’s amazing really.”

About 300 flights in and out of London’s Heathrow and Gatwick airports had already been cancelled before the airspace was closed, leaving many of the 260,000 passengers who typically use the airports each day with nowhere to go.

“Basically we’re stranded here, and a lot of people are angry. I realise it’s an act of God — however it would be nice to have another exit strategy,” said Isobel Connolly, who was due to fly from Heathrow to Ireland.

In 1982, British Airways and Singapore Airways jumbo jets lost their engines when they flew into an ash cloud over Indonesia, while a KLM flight had a similar experience in 1989 over Alaska.

“On each occasion, the plane fell to within a few thousand feet of the ground before it was possible to restart the engines,” Rothery said.